Rotten colours, try it in black and white.

I was out photographing at one of my favourite locations yesterday, and was struggling with the early Autumn colours. The beech trees were a greeny yellow, and the results were looking a little bit insipid on the LCD screen. But I had found what I thought was an interesting framing, when I posted this on Naturescapes.net I called it 3 2 1 Beeches, it should be pretty obvious why.

3 2 1 Beeches, colour.

3 2 1 Beeches, colour.

So, what to do about the insipid colour? I decided to flick across the Adobe Lightroom presets, and try some of the options. I’m kind of old school, I used to put the film in the camera, send it off, and get slides back. Simple. Now there are wonderful options for editing your shots on the computer. You can take the complex and hard work route (hours of hard work sometimes), or you can take the easy route with a few tweaks. That’s what I did with Lightroom. You go to develop module, hover the cursor over the presets, and you get an indication of what the preset will do to your image. I found the B&W Filter – Red Hi-Contrast Filter gave a lovely feel to this, all those insipid greeny/yellows were gone, and there is an almost dreamy effect to the final shot. The wind blur of the leaves against the solid trunk of the right hand beech makes this an interesting image for me. Viewing the results on the LCD on location (that sounds arty farty doesn’t it, on location, that’s not me, it means while I was there) was a little¬†disappointing. After a brief spell on the computer I have something I like quite a lot. Magic.

3 2 1 Beeches, B&W.

3 2 1 Beeches, B&W.

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